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Are you in recovery from a substance or behavior? Join us today!

IQRR is being taken to the next level!

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Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute awarded $1.7 million NIH grant to study social networking as an addiction recovery tool

A new study is currently in the works, funded by the National Institutes of Health, that plans to investigate how social media interactions could impact recovery. Read the official press release and keep an eye out here for more information in the near future!

Hey Recovery Heroes!

Let’s increase our presence on social media sites – Friend, like, follow, or pin us whenever you see our posts and use #IQRR and #recoveryregistry when you talk about the registry on social media. Share our story!

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Opinion Piece: Why Alcoholics Anonymous Works

The debate continues. This article argues for the efficacy of AA. What do you think?

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Holly’s Story

“I was a single mother dragging my son from hotel to hotel, from living at the dealer’s house to living on the streets. Often I would go to casino’s and try to get us out of the cold to sleep in the stairwells while stealing the leftover food left on the room service trays so that we could eat. I was out of control; absolutely lost.”

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10 Best Cities For Sober Living

“Pulling a geographic” in early sobriety is generally discouraged, but if you’re looking to leave behind people, places and things, The Fix recommends lighting out for these American cities–each with its own unique recovery community.

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Is addiction a brain disease?

The concept that addiction is a medical disease is now being linked to the drug war—and being challenged—by a number of contemporary theorists.

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Amy’s Story

“On July 7, 2010, I woke up and started a new life. I hadn’t been “straight” or “clean” for more than twenty years and now, I’ve been clean and sober for almost two. My life is much better.”

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Help us help others.

Why do some people succeed in overcoming addictions while others relapse, at great cost to their health, their families, and even their lives?
The International Quit & Recovery Registry taps the insights and experiences of people who are in recovery from an addiction—whether to tobacco, alcohol, drugs, or a harmful behavior. Sponsored by the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, the registry seeks to further scientific understanding of recovery and to inspire those struggling with addiction.

A Call for Heroes

The world needs heroes, people who have faced trials and tribulations and have emerged triumphant and ready to help others. The world needs heroes like you.

You have revealed your strength by deciding to help others after choosing to turn your life around. You have overcome adversities and found solutions that others can benefit from. You were willing to face the darkness from your past and have prevailed on your road to recovery. This, however, is not the end of your journey.

There are many people facing similar obstacles who need a hero to help them on their own path. You are that hero, not because of your own recovery, but because you are willing to give your time and share your experiences to the benefit those still struggling with addiction.

We are the International Quit & Recovery Registry, a project led by the Addiction Recovery Research Center, and we are calling for Recovery Heroes to help us help others. We need your help to advance our knowledge so that, together, we can help others succeed on their road to recovery.

Once a Hero, Always a Hero

The path to recovery is not easy and we understand relapse is often part of the process. Regardless of where you are in the recovery process, you are welcome as a member of our site and are encouraged to participate in our research!

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